Wednesday, 7 January 2015

Agile enables engagement of the nerd to be more appreciative

Prevent morbidity



On the plane back to work from Moose Jaw after the vacation, my smartphone was off. In order not to become a nervous wreck due to anxiety caused to lack of texting availability, I read a short article in the Air Canada magazine, En Route, which is French.

The name of the article was “Agility Prevents Fragility”, which I found to be rather clever. My father, Pierre Elliot, loved the work of Robert Service, who excelled in rhyming. Whenever I watch this link, I remember my Dad and think how proud he would be of my HR thought leadership.

The agility article shocked me because, unlike the Internet of Things, I understood immediately what I had not been smart enough to implement, although I am political and practical. As my Dad often pointed out, “you are a very very practical girl, Gloria. Your husband won’t need to do too much, will he?”
With all the respect for big data and the internet of things, I think agility is built to last, as it were. “As it were” is also built to last.

The moment I landed, I had a conference call with Cynthia Axe my downsizer and Hugh White, the straight white boy who runs Diversity. I demanded, nicely, that they demonstrate agility when supporting me.

Then, I sent a text to all our nerds in which I explained why compensation is not all that important; I asked them, assertively, to demonstrate more cognitive agility in assessing our reward structure.

I texted customer service "attendants" and explained to them how agile service can make our "shitty" product shine. (These is a term our unsophisticated clients use).

After which I pulled three slogans out of my sleeve: Lack of agility causes morbidity; agility increases fertility; be agile today, or meet Ms Axe tomorrow.

Finally, I changed the voice greeting of the HR voice menu, adding “for agile HR support, press 8".

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